What is Pupil Premium?

The Pupil Premium provides additional funding in addition to the main funding a school receives. It is targeted at students from disadvantaged backgrounds to ensure they benefit from the same opportunities as students from less deprived families.

It is currently paid to schools according to the number of pupils who have been:

  • Registered as eligible for free school meals at any point in the last 6 years (FSM)
  • In care for six months or longer (LAC)

Pupil premium strategy statement

This statement details our school’s use of pupil premium (and recovery premium for the 2021 to 2022 academic year) funding to help improve the attainment of our disadvantaged pupils.

It outlines our pupil premium strategy, how we intend to spend the funding in this academic year and the effect that last year’s spending of pupil premium had within our school.

School overview

Detail

Data

School name

Moat Community College

Number of pupils in school

1060

Proportion (%) of pupil premium eligible pupils

31.2%

Academic year/years that our current pupil premium strategy plan covers (3 year plans are recommended)

2021/22 to 2023/24

Date this statement was published

December 2021

Date on which it will be reviewed

July 2022

Statement authorised by

Brian Killeen, Principal

Pupil premium lead

David Buckle, Vice Principal

Governor / Trustee lead

Jo Hollings, Chair of Governors

Funding overview

Detail

Amount

Pupil premium funding allocation this academic year

£322,790

Recovery premium funding allocation this academic year

£ 48,140

Pupil premium funding carried forward from previous years (enter £0 if not applicable)

£0

Total budget for this academic year

If your school is an academy in a trust that pools this funding, state the amount available to your school this academic year

£370,930

Part A: Pupil premium strategy plan

Statement of intent

Moat Community College is firmly committed to ensuring equality in education and providing equal access to opportunities for all students, irrespective of their backgrounds. Pupil premium funding will be used to provide additional educational and pastoral support to improve the outcomes for disadvantaged pupils. The funding will be used to reduce the difference between the achievement of pupil premium students

and others.

 

To ensure that our spending is as effective as possible we will use a tiered approach; targeting spending in teaching, academic and pastoral support support and making use of wider support.

 

The key strategies we have identified to enable pupil premium students to overcome barriers to learning include; the need to ensure the provision of high quality teaching, the targeting of academic support for pupil premium students; the close monitoring of the attendance of pupil premium students and improving this attendance; to ensure that behaviour and attitudes to learning are good and are in keeping with our high aspirations for all and to provide emotional and pastoral support for pupil premium students.

 

Challenges

This details the key challenges to achievement that we have identified among our disadvantaged pupils.

Challenge number

Detail of challenge

1

High quality teaching for all: 2019 Progress 8 for disadvantaged students was 0.37 below other students. The number of GCSE grades 9-5 were 8% lower than for other students.

2

Academic support: Disadvantaged students have historically attended fewer intervention sessions than their peers. Learning support assistants (LSAs) are timetabled to support classes, but have not been previously deployed to include all disadvantaged students with support.

3

Attendance: Data indicates that the attendance of disadvantaged students is 3% overall below that of non-disadvantaged students. In some year groups the difference is a much as 5%.

4

Behaviour: Some disadvantaged students need additional support to ensure their behaviour and attitudes to learning allow them to make effective progress. Suspensions and internal exclusions are disproportionately higher for disadvantaged students than their peers. Proportion of disadvantaged external exclusions = 47%. Proportion of disadvantaged external exclusions =54%.

5

Emotional and pastoral support: Disadvantaged students have disproportionally shown a higher number of emotional and pastoral needs than other students.

Intended outcomes

This explains the outcomes we are aiming for by the end of our current strategy plan, and how we will measure whether they have been achieved.

Intended outcome

Success criteria

  1. Improved progress and attainment of disadvantaged students in GCSE examinations.

Progress 8 for disadvantaged students in 2021/22 will be no more than 0.35 below other students.

Progress 8 for disadvantaged students in 2023/24 will be no more than 0.30 below other students.

 

GCSE grades 9-5 for disadvantaged students in 2021/22 will be no more than 7.5% below other students.

 

GCSE grades 9-5 for disadvantaged students in 2023/24 will be no more than 6.5% below other students.

 

  1. Improved attendance in intervention sessions. More support in lessons for disadvantaged students.

Attendance of disadvantaged students in intervention sessions is at least as high as other students.

 

LSAs support more disadvantaged students in lessons.

 

3.  Improved attendance.

The gap between the attendance of disadvantaged and other students will be no more than 3% in 2021/22

The gap between the attendance of disadvantaged and other students will be no more than 2.5% in 2023/24

 

4.   Reduced number of external and internal exclusions for disadvantaged students.

 

 

 

The proportion of the total number of the external exclusions from the school in 2021/22 will be less than 40%.

The proportion of the total number of the external exclusions from the school in 2023/24 will be less than 35%.

 

The proportion of the total number of the einernal exclusions in the school in 2021/22 will be less than 45%.

 

The proportion of the total number of the internal exclusions in the school in 2023/24 will be less than 40%.

 

5.  Increase the number of disadvantaged students who access counselling and other support.

 

Disadvantaged students will take up at least 50% of counsellor apointments in 2021/22.

 

Disadvantaged students will take up at least 55% of counsellor apointments in 2023/24.

 

Activity in this academic year

This details how we intend to spend our pupil premium (and recovery premium funding) this academic year to address the challenges listed above.

Teaching (for example, CPD, recruitment and retention)

Budgeted cost: £132,870

Activity

Evidence that supports this approach

Challenge number(s) addressed

Teaching and Learning focusses on evidence-based strategies to support high quality teaching for all.

Leaders of more successful schools emphasise the importance of ‘quality teaching first’.

Supporting the Attainment of Disadvantaged Pupils (DFE, 2015)

 

Learning styles, Pupil Feedback and Mastery Learning.

The Education Endowment Foundation (EEF) toolkit (2021)

1

Additional English and mathematics teaching staff are supporting the curriculum and enabling tuition in small groups where needs are identified.

The EEF toolkit (2021) suggests that that such learning approaches can have a high impact.

1, 2

Teaching and Learning and Literacy teams are supported with TLRs. Teaching and Learning and the development of reading skills across the curriculum are  key school foci.

‘Quality teaching is the most important

lever schools have to improve outcomes for disadvantaged pupils’

The EEF toolkit (2021)

 

The EEF toolkit (2021) also recognises that the development of reading skills  and reading comprehension strategies have a ‘high impact’ on pupil outcomes

 

1

High quality CPD and the sharing of good practice.

High quality CPD for teachers has a significant effect on pupils’ learning outcomes.

Education in England: Annual Report 2020 – The Education Policy Institute

1

 

Targeted academic support (for example, tutoring, one-to-one support structured interventions)

Budgeted cost: £ 123,470

Activity

Evidence that supports this approach

Challenge number(s) addressed

‘Lesson 7’ Intervention sessions) for Year 11 pupils.

Intervention lessons for targeted groups in all other years.

Targeted academic support is used by successful schools to improve outcomes of disadvantaged pupils.

The EEF Guide to the Pupil Premium (2021)

 

Small group tuition has an average impact of +4 months.

The EEF toolkit (2021)

1, 2

Dedicated teaching assistants to support targeted interventions using data from Go4Schools.

One to one tuition can be effective, delivering approximately +5 months’ progress.

The EEF Guide to the Pupil Premium (2021)

The EEF toolkit (2021)

1,2

Books and revision guides provided to students as part of year 11 intervention strategy.

Independent study, meta- cognition and self-regulation can lead to +8 months progress.

Guided homework can have an impact of +5 monthsm on progress.

The EEF Guide to the Pupil Premium (2021)

1, 2

 

 

Wider strategies (for example, related to attendance, behaviour, wellbeing)

Budgeted cost: £ 114,590

Activity

Evidence that supports this approach

Challenge number(s) addressed

Pastoral/behaviour support staff to positively reinforce attitudes to learning and to reduce instances of poor behaviour.

Behaviour interventions will improve attitudes and attendance and benefit all pupils in the classroom.

The EEF toolkit (2021)

4

Pastoral support staff to have dedicated time and resources to work with outside agencies to improve  PP students’ attendance.

 

The Department for Education (DfE) published research in 2016 which found that: ‘Higher overall absence leads to lower attainment at KS2 and KS4’.

Improving school attendance: support for schools and local authorities (DfE 2021)

3

Continue with a system of rewards and incentives for improved attendance, behaviour and academic achievement.

Social and emotional support can improve attendance, behaviour and academic achievement.

The EEF toolkit (2021)

3, 4, 5

Support students’ well being and mental health with counselling service four days per week.

Social and emotional support can improve attendance, behaviour and academic achievement.

The EEF toolkit (2021)

3, 4, 5

Summer school for targeted Year 7 students as part of their transition to secondary school.

Summer schools have an impact of +3 months’ progress.

The EEF toolkit (2021)

1, 3, 4, 5

Subsidising disadvantaged students’ participation in extracurricular activities and visits.

Arts and other cultural  involvement can have an impact of +3 months’ progress.

The EEF toolkit (2021)

1, 3

 

Total budgeted cost: £ 370,930

Part B: Review of outcomes in the previous academic year

Pupil premium strategy outcomes

This details the impact that our pupil premium activity had on pupils in the 2020 to 2021 academic year.

 Our internal assessments during 2020/21 suggested that the performance of disad-vantaged pupils was lower than that of the previous two years in key areas of the curriculum.

Despite being on track during the first year (2018/19), the outcomes we aimed to achieve in our previous strategy by the end of 2020/21 were therefore not fully real-ised. 

Our assessment of the reasons for these outcomes points primarily to the impact of Covid-19, which disrupted all of our subject areas to varying degrees. As evidenced in schools across the country, partial closure was most detrimental to our disadvantaged pupils, and they were not able to benefit from our pupil premium funded improvements to teaching and targeted interventions to the degree that we intended.

Although overall attendance in 2020/21 was lower than in the preceding two years at 92%, it was higher than the national average. At times when all pupils were expected to attend school, absence among disadvantaged pupils was higher than their peers.

Our assessments demonstrated that pupil behaviour, wellbeing and mental health were affected last year, primarily due to Covid-19 related issues. The impact was worse for disadvantaged pupils. We used pupil premium funding to provide wellbeing support for all pupils, and targeted interventions where required.